About Us

DR John Durkin

Dr John DurkinDr John Durkin leads our team of mental health professionals and peer support associates around the globe. He combines his experience as a firefighter, and research and clinical expertise in resolving work related trauma and stress. John believes in building strong and honest relationships with our partnering organisations to get to know their core business and stressors to create a system of support that makes a difference. The system incorporates identification, intervention and monitoring.

Dr Durkin is an Approved Instructor in Critical Incident Stress Management and a trainer in Traumatic Incident Reduction. He trained a team of firefighters who he led to address the terrorist incidents in London in 2017 and then the Grenfell Tower fire. With no PTSD reported amongst police officers referred to him or the team he sees a new era of effective prevention and rapid resolution starting now. His rejection from the NICE PTSD committee in 2016 has seen renewed efforts to generate an evidence-base for this work and the creation of the STAGE-28 portal.

He inspired clinical psychologist Dr Renae Hayward, a former HR and health specialist to follow his vision after early successes following training. She is now a police psychologist, researcher and co-founder of STAGE-28 a system simple enough to work, clever enough to be legal and flexible enough to fit any organisation’s requirements.

Education and Work

  • Education

    University of Nottingham (2006-2010)
    PhD
    Psychological Growth Following Adversity: The Role of Social Support 

    Lancaster University (1997-1998)
    MSc.
    Psychological Research Methods

    University of Wales, Bangor (1994-1997)
    BSc (Hons.)
    Psychology with Health Psychology

  • Professional Activities

    International Critical Incident Stress Foundation (2017-Present)
    Board member

    Crisis Response Lead to Metropolitan Police Service (2017)
    Croydon Tram derailment, 2017 Terrorist attacks and Grenfell Tower Fire

    Education Sub-Committee Board (2013-2016)
    Crisis Intervention and Management, Australasia

    National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2015)
    Member of the PTSD Triage Panel

    World Vision International (2013-Present)
    Consultant and Crisis Intervention Trainer

    National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (2013-2014)
    Member of the PTSD Evidence Update Group

    Journal Reviewer (2009-Present):
    Journal of Traumatic Stress; Journal of Loss and Trauma;
    Anxiety, Stress and Coping; British Journal of Psychiatry

    Traumatic Incident Reduction Association (2006-Present)
    Chair of Crisis Response and Board member

  • Research Interests

    Occupations at high-risk for distress (fire, rescue, emergency, disaster); stress (vicarious, posttraumatic and occupational); posttraumatic growth; social support; quantitative methods; dissociation; effects of childhood trauma; trauma resolution; eye-witness testimony; social justice; self-actualisation.

  • Publications

    Durkin, J. & Hayward., R. (2019). The first 28 days in crisis support. In R Burke and S Pignata (Eds), Handbook of Research on Stress and Well-being. Edward Elgar. Manuscript under review.

    Durkin, J. (2015). What is Success? In Yule, W., Hawker, D., Hawker, D., Alexander, D., Holowenko, H., Tehrani, N., Durkin, J., & Hacker-Hughes, J. (Eds.), Early Interventions for Trauma: Proceedings from symposia held 25 November 2014 and 8 January 2015 (pp. 57-68).

     Hawker, D. M., Durkin, J., & Hawker, D. S. J. (2011). To debrief or not to debrief our heroes: That is the question. Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, 18, 453-463.

    Murphy, D., Durkin, J., & Joseph, S. (2010). Growth in relationship: A post-medicalized vision for positive transformation. In N. Tehrani (Ed.) Managing Trauma in the Workplace. London: Routledge.

    Durkin, J., & Joseph, S. (2009). Growth following adversity and its relation with subjective well-being and psychological well-being. Journal of Loss and Trauma, 3, 228-234.

  • Presentations

    ICISF 15th World Congress on Stress, Trauma and Coping. Firefighters for Cops: Crisis intervention following terrorism and the Grenfell Tower fire. 23 May 2019, Baltimore MD, USA.

    ICISF 15th World Congress on Stress, Trauma and Coping. Firefighting for Shrinks. 24 May 2019, Baltimore MD, USA.

    ICISF 15th World Congress on Stress, Trauma and Coping. Crisis or Disorder? The Magic Month. 24 May 2019, Baltimore MD, USA.

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Dr Renae Hayward

Renae Hayward

Dr Renae Hayward is a specialist in psychological trauma who is breaking new ground in the speed, thoroughness and endurance of traumatic stress resolution. She has a background in workplace injury management who adopted the methods used with police officers after the terrorist attacks and Grenfell Tower fire in London in 2017. Those methods, combined with theory-led risk-assessment and secure online data-collection grew into STAGE-28, a fully-comprehensive program designed to address traumatic reactions, restore function and initiate posttraumatic growth within 28 days of exposure.

Dr Hayward is driven by a keen interest in mental health, resilience, personal growth and the prevention and treatment of trauma reactions and symptoms. She has a breadth of experience having worked as an organisational consultant, clinical practitioner and academic researcher within a variety of contexts. She utilises a client-centred approach and applies a range of evidence-based interventions suited to individual and organisational needs.

Dr Hayward has combined her human resources, clinical practice and research expertise with a decade of work in emergency response, health and university sectors to contribute to the development of STAGE-28.

Education and Work

  • Education

    Master of Psychology (Clinical), Flinders University (Feb 2012 – Jan 2014)

    Doctor of Philosophy (Psychology), University of South Australia (Feb 2008 – Jun 2012)

    Graduate Certificate in University Education, University of South Australia (Feb 2008 – Nov 2011)

    Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of South Australia (Feb 2004 – Nov 2007)

    Bachelor of Business (Human Resource Management), Curtin University (WA) (Feb 1988 – Dec 1992)

  • Professional Activities

    PhD Associate Supervisor (2014- 2017) – “Prevention of Mental Disorder Injuries in the    Community Services Industry: Developing Emotional Boundary Management Skills

    South Australian EMDR Peer Support Network (APS interest group) – Chair 2017-2018

    Crisis Intervention and Management, Australasia – Committee of Management South Australian Representative – 2017 to present

    Convener of Traumatic Incident Reduction Peer Support Network 2018 to present

  • Research Interests

  • Publications

    Durkin, J. & Hayward., R. (2018). The first 28 days in crisis support. In R Burke and S Pignata (Eds), Handbook of Research on Stress and Well-being. Edward Elgar. Manuscript under development.

    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1464-0597.2010.00424.x

    https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/
    9781315743325/chapters/10.4324/9781315743325-9

    https://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/S1479-3555%282013%290000011006

    Durkin, J. & Hayward., R. (2019). The first 28 days in crisis support. In R Burke and S Pignata (Eds), Handbook of Research on Stress and Well-being. Edward Elgar. Manuscript under review.

    Boyd, C., Hayward, R., Tuckey, M., Dollard, M., & Dorman, C. (2014). Emotion Work in Service Occupations: Links to Wellbeing and Job Performance. In M. van Veldhoven, R. Pecceiand A. Bakker (Eds.), Current issues in Work and Organizational Psychology. Psychology Press (a Routledge/Taylor & Francis company).

    Hayward, R.M., & Tuckey, M.R. (2013). Emotional Boundary Management: A new adaptive approach to emotion regulation at work. In P.L. Perrewé, J. Halbesleben, and C. C. Rosen (Eds), Research in Occupational Stress and Well Being The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation (Vol. 11). Emerald Group Publishing. 

    Hayward, R.M., & Tuckey, M.R. (2011). Emotions in uniform: How nurses regulate emotions at work via emotional boundaries. Human Relations, 64(11), 1501-1523.

    Tuckey, M.R., & Hayward, R.M., (2011). Global and specific emotional resources as buffers against the emotional demands of fire-fighting. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 60(1), 1-23.

    Hayward, R., & Tuckey, M.R. (2007). Well-being in volunteer fire-fighters: Moving beyond critical incidents to examine the role of emotional demands and resources, in particular camaraderie. In M. Dollard, T. Winefield, M. Tuckey, & P. Winwood (Eds.), Conference Proceedings 7th Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference/ 1st Asia Pacific Congress on Work and Organisational Psychology (pp. 129-133). Adelaide: Australian Psychological Society.

  • Presentations

    ICISF 15th World Congress on Stress, Trauma and Coping. Crisis or Disorder? The Magic Month. 24 May 2019, Baltimore MD, USA.

    10th Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference (IOP)- Crossing Borders: Exploring the contribution of psychology to organisations in a global economy. (July 2013, Perth) – ‘To connect or not to connect: A new approach to emotion regulation and building personal resources in the work context’.

    6th Asia Pacific Symposium of Emotions in Worklife (Nov 2011)- To distance or connect: The adaptive nature or emotion regulation”.

    International Congress of Applied Psychology, Melbourne (ICAP 2010, 11 – 16 July)- "The positive and negative consequences of emotion regulation in nursing."

    14th European Congress of Work and Organizational Psychology, Compostela del Santiago, Spain (EAWOP 2009, 13-16 May)- “Emotions in Uniform: The why, when, and how of emotion regulation in the nursing context”.

    15th Australasian Conference on Traumatic Stress: Challenges for the coming decade (ACOTS 2008, Sept). “Psychological well-being and positive changes in outlook in frontline police officers”.

    7th Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference (IOP)/ 1st Asia Pacific Congress on Work and Organisational Psychology (APCWOP 2007, June) – “Well-being in volunteer fire-fighters: Moving beyond critical incidents to examine the role of emotional demands and resources, in particular camaraderie”.

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©2019 Dr John Durkin